« Meet the New Movie Marathon Man | Main | Discovering ‘The Human Experience’ »

March 25, 2011

'Expelled' Writer Tackles One Hell of a Movie

Kevin Miller explores questions about hell in a new documentary, due sometime in 2012

hellbound.JPG

Kevin Miller apparently isn't afraid of controversy. A few years ago, he co-wrote the script for Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, a documentary which examined "academic freedom" -- specifically, why college profs who believed in intelligent design weren't allowed to teach it, or even mention it in some cases.

Now, in the wake of the Rob Bell conversations about free will, destiny, universalism, and the existence of hell, Miller is tackling the underworld itself in an upcoming documentary called Hellbound? (And yes, the question mark is part of the title.)

“While recent challenges to the traditional view of hell are grabbing headlines, most people recognize this controversy is nothing new,” Miller says in a recent press release. “For centuries, people have wondered, if God is our pure, all-loving Creator, how can he allow billions of sinners to suffer for eternity in hell? Is it possible we’ve got hell wrong? Or are recent attempts to find a way around traditional teachings on hell a vain attempt to avoid the inevitable? These are the questions I want to explore.”

Miller adds, “Rather than endorse or exclude a particular position, I’m interested in talking to leading voices on all sides of the debate to discover how the various perspectives on hell developed and what our beliefs about hell reveal about God, the Bible and, ultimately, ourselves.”

The film will go into production this summer, wrap in the fall, and likely be released sometime in 2012,.

Comments

I think that this current 'debate' and 'discussion' on Hell will only end in a good many evangelicals abandoning one of the elements of sound doctrine (the biblical definition of Hell as eternal conscious torment.) While it's good that the filmmaker is including 'all sides,' he's also including the unbiblical side of the argument.

Confused as to why what I believe about hell affects who God is or what the Bible says. I get the part about how what I believe reveals about me. I am referring to this statement in the article: "I’m interested in talking to leading voices on all sides of the debate to discover how the various perspectives on hell developed and what our beliefs about hell reveal about God, the Bible and, ultimately, ourselves." Shouldn't he start with who God is and what the Bible says and how that should affect my belief?

@ Nobody Special: It depends on what Miller's purpose is. If he is making a documentary that seeks to explore the various perspectives on hell, then he wouldn't necessarily start with who God is, what the Bible says, and how that should affect our belief. Since Miller made it clear that his intention is not to endorse any particular position, why would we expect him to start with what the Bible says? It sounds to me like he simply wants to present an historical summary of how the various beliefs about hell developed. As a Bible-believing Christian, I don't think that followers of Jesus should feel threatened by such a film. After all, this could be a great avenue for bringing up discussions about heaven and hell with those outside of Christ!

@ Nobody Special: This is Kevin Miller. I probably could have phrased my quote a bit better. This may help clarify: Rather than endorse or exclude a particular position, I’m interested in talking to leading voices on all sides of the debate to discover how the various perspectives on hell developed and what our beliefs about hell reveal about how we perceive God, the Bible and, ultimately, ourselves.

Kevin, Thank you, that does clarify it for me. I appreciate your willingness to help me.

For those who don't believe in a Hell, how would they correct Jesus if He were visibly standing in front of them? One Pastor from Garden Grove, Calif told me "I was raised with that Hellfire and brimstone stuff in Michigan. I told him that Jesus spoke more about Hell than anyone else in the Bible and He said that a servant is not greater than his master. I asked him "do you have a better approach than Jesus?" This is called the great falling away just before our Lord's return. I'm not surprised.

@Kevin Miller: Thanks for participating in this forum. I'm curious if you are going to include in your potpourri the position known as "conditional immortality," a minority position with a growing number of evangelical adherents that holds to a very real lake of fire that is eternal in its existence, but finite as to each condemned individual's experience. In other words, very real punishment that is eternal in affect, but limited in duration.

Miller has already showed his true colors with 'Expelled', a movie that wondered why 'intelligent design' wasn't allowed to be taught in science classes without ever realizing the very simple answer - 'intelligent design' is superstition, not science! I'm sure he'll find some way to support the barbaric sadism of the Almighty in his newest work of schlock.

I have always liked the rather unbiblical view of a Russian mystics that heaven and hell are the same place . . .for someone who has used this life to grow in love with God it is heaven, but for someone who has spent it in rebellion against God, it will be hell.

More a helpful tool in showing "why we are here", than "where are we going"

In what way would you say the view of Russian mystics is "unbiblical"?

I can hear Jesus say over and over again: "You err because you do not know the scriptures." Hell is not so hard to figure out. It is not figurative. It is not here on earth. It is not temporary. It is not simply separation from God (certainly the knowing presence of God and the work of His hands is indelibly there for eternity). Modern evangelicals and Christians of many flavors fear man and not God. We use the wisdom of man in a never-ending PR campaign to get the world to finally like us, so in our false and incomplete modern gospel of emphasizing the "love" of God without the justice and reality of what one is being saved from, we diminish the holiness of God, and our Christian culture in music, preaching, teaching, literature, etc, reflects it. When will we realize that the everlasting destruction of Hell actually glorifies God by making His efforts to get our attention through the millinia, especially via the cross and resurrection, as well as other characteristics of His, such as His patience, longsuffering and forbearance in spite of our rebellion, stand out like a diamond against a black velvet cloth?

So God needs billions of people suffering for eternity (the black velvet cloth) in order to make him look good? Let me ask me something: Does a painting become more beautiful if you put something ugly beside it? Or, rather, does the ugliness detract from the beauty? Just something to ponder...

shopping